The Power of Collaborative Efforts


“There is no such thing as a self-made man. You will reach your goals only with the help of others.” – George Shinn


In our current post-authoritarian leadership methodology, teamwork is the main component to the success of any organization. Numerous studies have shown that it’s a more humble, inclusive leadership style that makes a company stand out from their very good competitors.


Participative Premises

  

Max Depree says, “What is it most of us really want from work? We would like to find the most effective, most productive, most rewarding way of working together. We would like to know that our work process uses all of the appropriate and pertinent resources: human, physical, financial.


We would like a work process and relationships that meet our personal needs for belonging, for contributing, for meaningful work, for the opportunity to make a commitment, for the opportunity to grow and be at least reasonably in control of our own destinies. Finally, we’d like someone to say, “Thank you!” (1)


“Find a group of people who challenge and inspire you, spend a lot of time with them, and it will change your life.” – Amy Poehler


Collaborative Efforts Work Best


From the era of management to the leadership awakening, to where we are now in an age of teamwork. The “Collaborative Effort” model has placed leaders at all levels on notice. The “Lone Ranger” mentality is too ineffective to produce significant transformations in business and society.


An excellent example of the “Collaborative Effort” model is Mary Barra who, came up through the ranks during her 34 years of employment at General Motors to become the CEO.


Barra became the CEO of General Motors on January 15, 2014. During her tenure she’s had to guide the company through the dangerous minefield of recovering from bankruptcy. Her abilities were tested many times as she led GM through recalls and the public relations gauntlet that usually accompanies it.


Barra likes to develop a collaborative work culture, where people are free to weigh in on a variety of issues. Her team effort approach allows her to glean input from any number of sources. She regularly engages her team and is known as an active listener, and her people skills make her easily approachable.


So, how has Barra’s collaborative leadership style worked out for GM? General Motors earned more than $35 billion in revenue in the second quarter of this year (2018) and record high deliveries overseas.


GM’s turn around by Barra’s collaborative leadership effort proves that “Everything rises and falls on leadership.”  Transformational leaders influence personnel for better or worse at all levels of an organization.


The Power of Collaborative Efforts works because it provides all team members with a voice and an invested interest in the success of the organization.


If your available on January 12, 2019, I would love for you to join us at our full day communication boot camp. We will be discussing some of the points highlighted in this article along with many others. Hope you can join us. You can learn more here https://lionsprideleadership.com/product/in-person-communication-bootcamp/.


Three Empowering Aspects of The Collaborative Leadership Style


1. Sharing Information

  1. Sharing information is the centerpiece of a collaborative effort.

  2. Sharing information gets everyone on the same page at the same time.

  3. The more information everyone has the more ideas and possible solutions can be discussed.

2. Every Idea Has Possibilities

  1. With everyone free to contribute ideas, the team approaches issues with a variety of perspectives and shared insights.

  2. Within this culture of trust members take personal responsibility to produce for the team.

3. Enhanced Performance and Growth

  1. Every member is valued and assumes equal responsibility to think, speak, and act in unison. Constructive criticism is never personal within an environment of collective identity (we succeed or fail together).

  2. Leaders will share their insights and experience with the team.

  3. The leader’s instruction encouragement and coaching raise the team’s collective leadership lid.

(1) Max Depree, “Leadership Is an Art” (p. 23). The Crown Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.


*** This article was authored by John Picarello, Chief Leadership Officer at Lions Pride Leadership Co.***

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